Learn To Type Fast With Touch Typing For Beginners

We can find smart phone, tablet PC, laptop and computers everywhere and people cannot separate those machines from their life. They need all those gadgets to work, playing and socialize on their daily life. In the past, people type with a pen and a paper but nowadays they do their job with computer so they need a good typing skill. When we apply for a job vacation, the company will always put a computer skill on the requirement and this include typing skill. People who are good in typing usually have speed and good touch typing skill. But if you feel that your typing skill is not good, you can find lots of touch typing for beginners guideline books or from the Internet.

Why we need to learn touch typing.

When we work with a computer, the most important thing is the keyboard where you enter the command or anything. When you do not have a good touch typing skills, it will reduce your speed to finish your job. The most ideal typing speed for people is 60 to 100 words per minute and if you cannot do that, it is time for you to get any information about touch typing for beginners. If you master touch typing skill, you will improve and able to complete your jobs faster and have more time to finish other jobs. Touch typing skill is also good for you because you will able to read what you type right away and fix the error. And the fastest way to master this skill is by learning and practices it everyday to make your finger memorize the buttons position.

The benefit of touch typing.

Learning on touch typing for beginners is good because it will help us to improve our skill but it also has other benefits. Typing skill is not only for a writer but all people who depend on computer to do their jobs. When we able to type faster and reduce the mistake or typo, it will gives us more time to think about other ideas on our project and complete the project before the deadline. It is also good for our health because it will reduce our time in front of the computer. We have more time to rest both our eyes and shoulders. Learning the basic typing for beginner is good not only for our job but also increase our private life productivity. When you able to type faster with less mistake, you will find that typing is fun and profitable.

The Benefits of Going to a University

There are numerous benefits of seeking higher education. It is a hardly rewarding experience and almost guarantees good stable employment in the future. University life broadens the horizon of every student who opts for it. The rising cost of education and the dire economic conditions has forced a number of students to think twice before going for a degree. Even with skyrocketing tuition fees, the several advantages of going to university cannot be ignored. Here are some of the top benefits of getting higher education.

Better Employment Prospects

The degree that you seek defines the future career path you choose for yourself. There are far greater prospects of landing a good job once you have graduated. Without a degree in hand, the options for employment are limited and you cannot enter any specialized field. Studying a subject for a few years shows your dedication and commitment to learn it. The employers hold this in high regard when they are interviewing candidates for employment. You can enhance the chances of having a successful career in the future by getting a degree.

Independence

University life is vastly different from school and college. You live and study there, giving you complete independence. Not only are you on your own, you have to make decisions, do your shopping and plan. This is the best preparation for an independent life ahead. The best thing about it all is that you are going to have a great time with friends that you won’t even notice that you are learning. This is why most graduates reminisce about their university years.

Studying Your Favorite Subject

You might not consider studying to be a benefit but a chore, but getting to explore all the aspects of your favorite subject is an exciting prospect. You are not forced to take on a number of subjects like in school. You pick the subject you are interested in and study it for three or four years. Moreover, there are many subjects that are offered only at university level. Studying something of interest is a great experience.

Extra-Curricular Activities

Having fun is also a part of your student life. Universities have clubs and societies for students who are interested in activities away from the curriculum. From debating to soccer to drama to salsa, the best universities have a society for all activities. Plus, if there is any activity you are interested in but no society to join, you have the chance to create one yourself.

These are the benefits that can be enjoyed by having a university education. Higher education is an opportunity every student should avail.

Why a College Education Is Important

A college or university education allows students to learn from people who have been in the field they are studying in. A student in the career of Communication Arts can have professors that worked in the Pentagon during the Clinton administration and worked during the Monica Lewinsky scandal. A student can even have professors that are professional screenwriters that give them summer jobs on movie sets. When a student has a professor there that can share personal, professional stories, it is a huge advantage to the student. At colleges and universities, students can learn from their professors’ mistakes and work experiences.

Students also gain a lot of experience in networking. There are so many people on a campus that share similar interests and are willing to make personal and professional contacts that are mutually beneficial in a future career. Imagine a student wanting the job of the press secretary at the White House and they were friends with the new president. It is probably going to be a lot easier for the student to get their dream job, or at least be in the running for it.

Being at a college or university helps develop social skills needed for future careers. Some students could have come from a small high school or just maybe were not as social. Now, they have to be social to meet new people and make friends, especially if they live on campus. There is no way to avoid talking to and meeting new people on a college campus. Even the smaller Universities are crawling with a couple thousand students. Then many campuses offer student organizations for someone to join. No matter the interest, a student can meet someone that shares their interests and develop people skills.

A college or university also promotes teamwork and unity. Students cheer for their teams at football, soccer, volleyball, and al kinds of sports. It creates a feeling of oneness with fellow students. The feeling of a common goal with thousands of other students is a feeling that demands to be felt. Many courses also have group projects that require more in-depth participation and peer evaluations. This teaches students to act as a team and take responsibility for their part in the machine.

Colleges/universities also teach professional skills beyond the classrooms. All colleges and universities have student emails that are monitored and are the main source of communication between faculty and students. Students learn how to answer their emails appropriately and hoe to effectively communicate through email. Many colleges and universities also provide classes with group work that prepares students to work in a professional environment. These classes allow students to practice writing speeches for others to give, write generic crisis plans for future organizations, practice putting together media kits for their future organizations, and allows students to practice and hone professional skills they will need after they graduate.

Colleges and Universities can be quite expensive, but the education that can be obtained is worth filling out a million scholarship applications. At a college/university, students can learn from people already in the business, gain a lot of future business connections with people outside of their major, help develop professional social skills, develop a foundation of teamwork and unity, and students can learn professional technical skills to help them in their future careers. An education from a college or university is important because it is the only place a student can learn and grow with students just like them.

Quality Education Vs Accreditation

Education:

“The act or process of educating or being educated; the knowledge or skill obtained or developed by a learning process!”

Inquiries into furthering my educational aspirations were made to various colleges within my immediate environmental area. Several of the schools contacted required placement exams that I did not challenge, as I am adept and very capable of dealing with college examinations. The thing that got to me was the disparaging remarks from some college recruiters regarding their standards for education as opposed to another college. One of the schools that I’ve attended is a two-year degree school while the other is as well. They hold real estate in the same zip code and competed for students in the same local. They both educated local students as well as out of state and students from other countries and nations.

One school considered itself superior to the other by reason of accreditation. The school that was described as inferior did not have middle states accreditation. The school was described as below standard by the other. The so-called superior school is lead and operated by a non-HBCU affiliation while the other happened to be lead and operated by an African American staff. The self-described superior school has made plans, designs, and did bid for the take-over of the African American school. Albeit, the self-described superior school admits that it does not and will not accept credentials from the so-called inferior school. I have attended both of these institutions and received very good instruction from its teachers as well. While the lessons learned were an invaluable source of information, the education that I received from personal academic research (self-taught) has enhanced my knowledge base. Money was not a factor in my personal research, study, and/or practicum. I would add, the knowledge and information that was derived from the HBCU School proved to be equally rewarding as the other if not better!

Personally, I would say that I received more educational value at the HBCU (Historical Black Colleges and Universities) as opposed to the other collegiate institution. Albeit, they both required money.

When students visit college campuses they are encouraged to become a student at that particular school. The tour guides’ show all of the amenities and accolades that are offered in order to get you enrolled…and to gain your tuition monies. But what about the quality of education offered by the particular schools? The majority of the colleges will often quote their accreditation as compared to another school of choice. What has accreditation to do with a good and valuable quality education? Money! And the ability to make money! Education does not and should not require money! 

In 1899 Dr. Matthew Anderson, an outstanding community leader, and his wife Caroline Still Anderson founded Berean Manual and Industrial School. Dr. Anderson was a pivotal influence in the religious, business, and educational history of Philadelphia. Dr. Anderson also founded the Berean Presbyterian Church and the Berean Savings Fund Society.

Caroline Still is the daughter of the great William Still, a Philadelphia Abolitionist and member of the Underground Railroad.

Mr. William Still (a self-educated man), one of seventeen children, was born in Burlington County in 1821. His father escaped slavery from Maryland to New Jersey and later was followed by his wife and children. William Still left New Jersey for Philadelphia in 1844. Three years later he was appointed secretary of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society.

“When Brother William Still was 23, he left the family farm in New Jersey for Philadelphia, to seek his fortune. He arrived, friendless with only five dollars in his possession. Mr. Still taught himself to read and write. In fact, so well, that in three years he was able to gain and hold the position of secretary in the Pennsylvania Abolition Society. Brother Still provided the all-white society with his views on how to aid fugitive slaves. After all, he had been one himself. He was such an asset to the group, that he was elected chairman in 1851. Still held the position for the next ten years. He also became chairman of the Vigilance Committee in 1852. Still was the first black man to join the society and was able to provide first-hand experience of what it was like to be a slave.”

“Mr. Still established a profitable coal business in Philadelphia. His house was used as one of the stations on the Underground Railroad. Brother Still interviewed escaped fugitives and kept careful records of each so that their family and friends might locate them. According to his records, Still helped 649 slaves receive their freedom. The number is compounded with the number of slaves saved by Sister Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad.”

“William Still, a self-educated man, began his campaign to end racial discrimination on Philadelphia streetcars. He wrote an account of this campaign in Struggle for the Civil Rights of the Coloured People of Philadelphia in the City Railway Cars (1867). He followed this with The Underground Railroad (1872) and Voting and Laboring (1874).”

“William Still, a self-educated man, established an orphanage for the children of African-American soldiers and sailors. Other charitable work included the founding of a Mission Sabbath School and working with the Young Men’s Christian Association. William Still died in Philadelphia on 14th July, 1902.”

The Concise History of Berean Institute:

“In 1904 Berean Institute of Philadelphia Pennsylvania qualified for state aid and received a grant of $10,000. Over the years, state aid has enabled the school to expand its services and diversify its programs of study. Funds from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania now provide a significant portion of the total operating budget. Berean Institute embarked on a program of expansion under the dynamic leadership of the late Dr. William H. Gray, Jr., who utilized the support of many influential citizens of Pennsylvania including the former Governor Milton J. Shapp. Dr. Gray served as Chairman of the Berean Board of Trustees. Under Dr. Gray’s leadership Berean Manual and Industrial School began operating as Berean Institute. He also had Berean Institute’s current building constructed in 1973.”

“Mrs. Lucille P. Blondin, who served the school for forty-five years, became Berean Institute’s first President. Mrs. Blondin retired in June 1993. Dr. Norman K. Spencer was appointed to serve as the second President and Chief Executive Officer. Under Dr. Spencer’s leadership, contracted programs funded by the City and Commonwealth agencies as well as community outreach projects have been added. Hon. John Braxton, former Judge, Court of Common Pleas heads a list of distinguished Board of Trustees members.”

“Berean Institute enrolled students in full and part-time programs. Most of the students are residents of the Commonwealth and live in Philadelphia. Other students have come from Central and South America, China, India, Puerto Rico, Tonga, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Nigeria, Tanzania, the Dominican Republic, England, Cambodia, Viet Nam and states along the eastern seaboard of the United States.”

“A number of students come to learn a marketable skill and their Berean training fulfills their current educational aspirations. Many others regard the school as a stepping-stone to further education. Berean has many graduates who have gone on to earn four-year college degrees and others who have completed graduate studies at some of the area’s outstanding institutions of higher learning.”

The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s Department of Education granted Berean Institute approval to award the Associate in Specialized Technology Degree on September 15, 1976, and the Associate in Specialized Business Degree on December 27, 1976.

Again, education is:

“The act or process of imparting or acquiring general knowledge, developing the powers of reasoning and judgment, and generally of preparing oneself or others intellectually for mature life; the act or process of imparting or acquiring particular knowledge or skills, as for a profession; a degree, level, or kind of schooling: a university education; .the result produced by instruction, training, or study: to show one’s education; the science or art of teaching; pedagogics.”

A definition of education: ‘The act or process of educating or being educated; the knowledge or skill obtained or developed by a learning process; a program of instruction of a specified kind or level: driver education; a college education; the field of study that is concerned with the pedagogy of teaching and learning; an instructive or enlightening experience:

Dictionary.com Unabridged

Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2009

So why does another school rate it’s accreditation over and above that of another? Money! Many colleges and universities rate its’ educational values based on the amount of money in its’ coffers as well as the amount of money that they can amass!  Another tool to increase superiority in the education business is to attain and maintain accreditation and as many acquisitions as possible.

Several opinions suggest education achieved through these venues is designed to prepare people/students for the job market as opposed to being prepared for life skills. The skills required to carry ones posterity and their descendants that follow into prosperous futures.

Is it fair to assess the stature of a collegiate institution above any other based on the amount of money that is needed to be spent or the amount of education that is achieved? Ivy league institutions turn out many students who are not prepared for the challenges of life…but many of them are rich and have spent thousands of dollars to attend those schools as well as graduating from them. On the other hand, many poor people that are lucky enough to qualify for grants, loans, scholarships, etc., are better prepared to face the challenges set before them (so it seems).

Many poor and working poor students seem to value the collegiate level education as if their life depended upon it, so they tend to work a bit harder to achieve the degree status. The document can be deemed worthless when the graduate cannot find the desired job for which he/she has studied. It is even worse when the graduated student finds that they are worse off than when they started college. They are now burdened with school loan debt plus the debts that they have had to meet before attending college. Working at McDonalds and the like, seem to be the only job that is attainable for many of them. The competition is fierce. These students are for the most part, grouped in with many applicants that are not college educated and many do not have high school diplomas as well! The knowledge attained is not considered or tested by many of these employers. Kiosk type pictures on a cash-register computer is what they have to work with. Is this not insulting to a student who has studied computer science, read and write computer programs and its languages, as well as other academics of study? 

Why is it that many non-ivy league students find themselves out of work? Why is it that many of them find that they are the first to lose their employment positions compared to their ivy-league colleagues? Why is it that many inner-city college educated graduates find themselves less likely to be selected as team-leaders than their counter part ivy-leaguers? Many employers advertise their openings with statements that don’t require a college level education. They ask that candidates simply have a high school level education. College educated candidates apply to those openings and find themselves scrutinized out of the running, i.e., background checks, credit checks, criminal histories, schooling activities, etc. Why is it college educated candidates find that not only do they have to compete with ivy-leaguers, they have to compete with high school educated folks as well. What is the sense in enduring hours, years, and other sacrifices to attain the coveted two and/or four-year college level degree when you’re not going to qualify for the job anyway? 

The notion of accreditation, money, and notable stature should not be the basis of choosing the collegiate route to education. Education should be based on ones ability to achieve, retain, and utilize education. The achievement of education begins in the home (as well as anyone who desires it). It begins with the Childs’ upbringing and the stressed importance placed by the parent and/or guardian. Should the child be highly scholastic in abilities that enable him/her to be described as intellectually talented above average, that student deserves free college education. While the rest of us who are collegiate material may well have to pay for our higher education. Mind you, my argument is based on the ability to access education without having to spend money…teachers need to earn a living, schools need to pay the costs of operating and maintaining buildings and staff. So the money has to come from somewhere. Albeit, the aforementioned disparages between different colleges should cease the practice of who’s a better institution of higher learning. Is it the responsibility of educated people to enlighten people who are not?

While many may not be aware, education is achievable without attending so-called accredited and/or less accredited schools, of higher learning…start with the libraries in your homes as well as the public facilities, news papers, magazines, shared information, and articles. Why is the education attained by others kept to a level of secrecy that one should have to pay for it?

Attained and acquired education is the responsibility of the educational pursuer…the burden is placed solely on the student not the educational pursued. I’m not advocating that one can become a doctor, architect, or a lawyer by simply reading text…there is a difference between education and training.

Education is yours to achieve and it can be free.

Acknowledgements:

Dictionary.com

Biography of William Still

Biography of the Berean Institute

Quality Education Vs Accreditation

Education:

“The act or process of educating or being educated; the knowledge or skill obtained or developed by a learning process!”

Inquiries into furthering my educational aspirations were made to various colleges within my immediate environmental area. Several of the schools contacted required placement exams that I did not challenge, as I am adept and very capable of dealing with college examinations. The thing that got to me was the disparaging remarks from some college recruiters regarding their standards for education as opposed to another college. One of the schools that I’ve attended is a two-year degree school while the other is as well. They hold real estate in the same zip code and competed for students in the same local. They both educated local students as well as out of state and students from other countries and nations.

One school considered itself superior to the other by reason of accreditation. The school that was described as inferior did not have middle states accreditation. The school was described as below standard by the other. The so-called superior school is lead and operated by a non-HBCU affiliation while the other happened to be lead and operated by an African American staff. The self-described superior school has made plans, designs, and did bid for the take-over of the African American school. Albeit, the self-described superior school admits that it does not and will not accept credentials from the so-called inferior school. I have attended both of these institutions and received very good instruction from its teachers as well. While the lessons learned were an invaluable source of information, the education that I received from personal academic research (self-taught) has enhanced my knowledge base. Money was not a factor in my personal research, study, and/or practicum. I would add, the knowledge and information that was derived from the HBCU School proved to be equally rewarding as the other if not better!

Personally, I would say that I received more educational value at the HBCU (Historical Black Colleges and Universities) as opposed to the other collegiate institution. Albeit, they both required money.

When students visit college campuses they are encouraged to become a student at that particular school. The tour guides’ show all of the amenities and accolades that are offered in order to get you enrolled…and to gain your tuition monies. But what about the quality of education offered by the particular schools? The majority of the colleges will often quote their accreditation as compared to another school of choice. What has accreditation to do with a good and valuable quality education? Money! And the ability to make money! Education does not and should not require money! 

In 1899 Dr. Matthew Anderson, an outstanding community leader, and his wife Caroline Still Anderson founded Berean Manual and Industrial School. Dr. Anderson was a pivotal influence in the religious, business, and educational history of Philadelphia. Dr. Anderson also founded the Berean Presbyterian Church and the Berean Savings Fund Society.

Caroline Still is the daughter of the great William Still, a Philadelphia Abolitionist and member of the Underground Railroad.

Mr. William Still (a self-educated man), one of seventeen children, was born in Burlington County in 1821. His father escaped slavery from Maryland to New Jersey and later was followed by his wife and children. William Still left New Jersey for Philadelphia in 1844. Three years later he was appointed secretary of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society.

“When Brother William Still was 23, he left the family farm in New Jersey for Philadelphia, to seek his fortune. He arrived, friendless with only five dollars in his possession. Mr. Still taught himself to read and write. In fact, so well, that in three years he was able to gain and hold the position of secretary in the Pennsylvania Abolition Society. Brother Still provided the all-white society with his views on how to aid fugitive slaves. After all, he had been one himself. He was such an asset to the group, that he was elected chairman in 1851. Still held the position for the next ten years. He also became chairman of the Vigilance Committee in 1852. Still was the first black man to join the society and was able to provide first-hand experience of what it was like to be a slave.”

“Mr. Still established a profitable coal business in Philadelphia. His house was used as one of the stations on the Underground Railroad. Brother Still interviewed escaped fugitives and kept careful records of each so that their family and friends might locate them. According to his records, Still helped 649 slaves receive their freedom. The number is compounded with the number of slaves saved by Sister Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad.”

“William Still, a self-educated man, began his campaign to end racial discrimination on Philadelphia streetcars. He wrote an account of this campaign in Struggle for the Civil Rights of the Coloured People of Philadelphia in the City Railway Cars (1867). He followed this with The Underground Railroad (1872) and Voting and Laboring (1874).”

“William Still, a self-educated man, established an orphanage for the children of African-American soldiers and sailors. Other charitable work included the founding of a Mission Sabbath School and working with the Young Men’s Christian Association. William Still died in Philadelphia on 14th July, 1902.”

The Concise History of Berean Institute:

“In 1904 Berean Institute of Philadelphia Pennsylvania qualified for state aid and received a grant of $10,000. Over the years, state aid has enabled the school to expand its services and diversify its programs of study. Funds from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania now provide a significant portion of the total operating budget. Berean Institute embarked on a program of expansion under the dynamic leadership of the late Dr. William H. Gray, Jr., who utilized the support of many influential citizens of Pennsylvania including the former Governor Milton J. Shapp. Dr. Gray served as Chairman of the Berean Board of Trustees. Under Dr. Gray’s leadership Berean Manual and Industrial School began operating as Berean Institute. He also had Berean Institute’s current building constructed in 1973.”

“Mrs. Lucille P. Blondin, who served the school for forty-five years, became Berean Institute’s first President. Mrs. Blondin retired in June 1993. Dr. Norman K. Spencer was appointed to serve as the second President and Chief Executive Officer. Under Dr. Spencer’s leadership, contracted programs funded by the City and Commonwealth agencies as well as community outreach projects have been added. Hon. John Braxton, former Judge, Court of Common Pleas heads a list of distinguished Board of Trustees members.”

“Berean Institute enrolled students in full and part-time programs. Most of the students are residents of the Commonwealth and live in Philadelphia. Other students have come from Central and South America, China, India, Puerto Rico, Tonga, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Nigeria, Tanzania, the Dominican Republic, England, Cambodia, Viet Nam and states along the eastern seaboard of the United States.”

“A number of students come to learn a marketable skill and their Berean training fulfills their current educational aspirations. Many others regard the school as a stepping-stone to further education. Berean has many graduates who have gone on to earn four-year college degrees and others who have completed graduate studies at some of the area’s outstanding institutions of higher learning.”

The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s Department of Education granted Berean Institute approval to award the Associate in Specialized Technology Degree on September 15, 1976, and the Associate in Specialized Business Degree on December 27, 1976.

Again, education is:

“The act or process of imparting or acquiring general knowledge, developing the powers of reasoning and judgment, and generally of preparing oneself or others intellectually for mature life; the act or process of imparting or acquiring particular knowledge or skills, as for a profession; a degree, level, or kind of schooling: a university education; .the result produced by instruction, training, or study: to show one’s education; the science or art of teaching; pedagogics.”

A definition of education: ‘The act or process of educating or being educated; the knowledge or skill obtained or developed by a learning process; a program of instruction of a specified kind or level: driver education; a college education; the field of study that is concerned with the pedagogy of teaching and learning; an instructive or enlightening experience:

Dictionary.com Unabridged

Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2009

So why does another school rate it’s accreditation over and above that of another? Money! Many colleges and universities rate its’ educational values based on the amount of money in its’ coffers as well as the amount of money that they can amass!  Another tool to increase superiority in the education business is to attain and maintain accreditation and as many acquisitions as possible.

Several opinions suggest education achieved through these venues is designed to prepare people/students for the job market as opposed to being prepared for life skills. The skills required to carry ones posterity and their descendants that follow into prosperous futures.

Is it fair to assess the stature of a collegiate institution above any other based on the amount of money that is needed to be spent or the amount of education that is achieved? Ivy league institutions turn out many students who are not prepared for the challenges of life…but many of them are rich and have spent thousands of dollars to attend those schools as well as graduating from them. On the other hand, many poor people that are lucky enough to qualify for grants, loans, scholarships, etc., are better prepared to face the challenges set before them (so it seems).

Many poor and working poor students seem to value the collegiate level education as if their life depended upon it, so they tend to work a bit harder to achieve the degree status. The document can be deemed worthless when the graduate cannot find the desired job for which he/she has studied. It is even worse when the graduated student finds that they are worse off than when they started college. They are now burdened with school loan debt plus the debts that they have had to meet before attending college. Working at McDonalds and the like, seem to be the only job that is attainable for many of them. The competition is fierce. These students are for the most part, grouped in with many applicants that are not college educated and many do not have high school diplomas as well! The knowledge attained is not considered or tested by many of these employers. Kiosk type pictures on a cash-register computer is what they have to work with. Is this not insulting to a student who has studied computer science, read and write computer programs and its languages, as well as other academics of study? 

Why is it that many non-ivy league students find themselves out of work? Why is it that many of them find that they are the first to lose their employment positions compared to their ivy-league colleagues? Why is it that many inner-city college educated graduates find themselves less likely to be selected as team-leaders than their counter part ivy-leaguers? Many employers advertise their openings with statements that don’t require a college level education. They ask that candidates simply have a high school level education. College educated candidates apply to those openings and find themselves scrutinized out of the running, i.e., background checks, credit checks, criminal histories, schooling activities, etc. Why is it college educated candidates find that not only do they have to compete with ivy-leaguers, they have to compete with high school educated folks as well. What is the sense in enduring hours, years, and other sacrifices to attain the coveted two and/or four-year college level degree when you’re not going to qualify for the job anyway? 

The notion of accreditation, money, and notable stature should not be the basis of choosing the collegiate route to education. Education should be based on ones ability to achieve, retain, and utilize education. The achievement of education begins in the home (as well as anyone who desires it). It begins with the Childs’ upbringing and the stressed importance placed by the parent and/or guardian. Should the child be highly scholastic in abilities that enable him/her to be described as intellectually talented above average, that student deserves free college education. While the rest of us who are collegiate material may well have to pay for our higher education. Mind you, my argument is based on the ability to access education without having to spend money…teachers need to earn a living, schools need to pay the costs of operating and maintaining buildings and staff. So the money has to come from somewhere. Albeit, the aforementioned disparages between different colleges should cease the practice of who’s a better institution of higher learning. Is it the responsibility of educated people to enlighten people who are not?

While many may not be aware, education is achievable without attending so-called accredited and/or less accredited schools, of higher learning…start with the libraries in your homes as well as the public facilities, news papers, magazines, shared information, and articles. Why is the education attained by others kept to a level of secrecy that one should have to pay for it?

Attained and acquired education is the responsibility of the educational pursuer…the burden is placed solely on the student not the educational pursued. I’m not advocating that one can become a doctor, architect, or a lawyer by simply reading text…there is a difference between education and training.

Education is yours to achieve and it can be free.

Acknowledgements:

Dictionary.com

Biography of William Still

Biography of the Berean Institute

Do Universities Help Cultivate Wisdom in Human Beings?

After getting accepted to Harvard University, I thought I would be receiving the best possible education that life has to offer. I was under the impression that the insights, teachings and wisdom that was shared there would provide me with inspiration for living and creating a well-rounded and balanced life. However, I soon realized that this was far from being true.

Harvard University is just like other universities in that the substance of the material taught emanates from the same place. Sure, the Harvard admissions standards make sure the students who attend there have stronger mental focus, academic rigor and determination to succeed academically, but this by no means indicates that students who attend Harvard or any other prestigious Ivy League school are somehow in a better position, humanely speaking, than students who do not attend such schools.

In fact, in taking a look back at past presidents of Harvard University going back from Henry Dunster all the way to Larry Summers, we will see that none of them had focused on cultivating the human spirit; rather, they aimed to provide mental tools to create citizens with mental expertise, not heart-felt or spiritual insight. This is true for the topics of Theology and Philosophy, as well as for Harvard University PhD programs.

While there may be specialized philosophical and theological topics such as “Philosophy of Man”, “Types of Religion in the United States” and “Jesus and Absolute Truth” being taught and lectured on in the philosophy and religion departments, the depth of insight is clearly missing the foundation of what it means to teach philosophy and religion. To teach a course on “Jesus and Absolute Truth”, for example, one would need to embody at least a certain degree of the ‘Absolute Truth’ which Jesus embodied in order for the class to be meaningful. The knowledge should emanate from the heart as it does with the Native American Apache Goddess of Wisdom.

University education in today’s world has very little to do with cultivating what it is that maximizes our human potential and gifts. Instead of creating new inspiring quotations, the current university education system merely works to analyze and break up surviving inspirational quotes. Human potential is not cultivated through brainwork, as is the focal point of universities throughout the world; rather, human potential is cultivated by heart work. In other words, human beings need to tap into their energetic and spiritual potential that emanates from the heart and penetrates their entire being by creating a sense of vibrancy, vitality and presence which even the best university education cannot possibly cultivate.

Is there any particular reason that a university is not capable of cultivating this human potential that emanates from the heart? Yes, the reason is that university faculty and professors are hired based on their mental or intellectual capabilities… the number of courses they have taught, the number of articles they have published and the amount of lectures they have given at universities across the world, just to name a few of the mental criteria.

This standard has nothing to do with cultivating the best in human potential and the human spirit. Cultivating the human heart and the human spirit can only be performed by people who themselves have had this practice and are ready to perform it on others. In order to be qualified to bring out the best of the human spirit or the human heart, one does not need a Harvard or an Ivy League education; in fact, one does not need any type of formal education whatsoever. Rather, a person simply needs to have had the human vibrancy brought out within their own souls, which can be accomplished very informally. Some of the most prominent spiritual teachers who bring out the best in the human spirit and the human heart around the world have had no formal education. Rather, all that some of them have had is a heart-based energetic training from their teacher(s) which does not result in any formal degree or certificate.

If we recognize that human potential is not tapped into by our current educational system, of which we view universities like Harvard, Princeton and Yale to be the ‘cream of the crop’, so to speak, then we can start to work towards shifting our societal focus to the realm that is important in cultivating great human beings… that is, the realm of the human heart. These are not just inspirational stories for work, but rather a means of transforming our world outlook. Only when Harvard and other top universities focus on this area of human energy can they live up to their reputation of cultivating the best in human potential.

Community Colleges – A Stepping Stone To University Education

If you are fortunate enough to live in a place where a community college provides classes, then you should make it a point to take advantage of the facility. This can be a great help to further your educational qualifications to advance your career. Community colleges provide some intensive courses in various educational areas. The courses are quite affordable and provide an impressive level of training.

Community colleges play an important role in providing affordable education; yet they are considered inferior in comparison to University education. This consideration is quite further from the truth. In fact, a good number of nurses are students of community colleges and are very well trained in their jobs. The associate degree nursing program provided by community colleges are rigorous courses that provide very good clinical experience and comparable to that of the bachelor of nursing degree courses provided by Universities. However, if you possess nursing training from a community college, most hospitals will not consider you a candidate for any administrative nursing position, as this requires a Bachelor’s degree.

There are many advantages of learning at the community college levels. One biggest advantage is the fact that the teachers at the community college are dedicated to teaching. They are more approachable and helpful to the students. They are not simultaneously working on their own projects and usually devote all their time to teaching at the community college. Students are never considered as an interruption in the pursuit of their own agenda.

Community Colleges are a supportive system for those individuals who are going back to academics after a long gap or for those who may not have been getting top grades at high school. The teacher to student ratio is lower in community colleges hence, the teaching faculty can provide personalized attention to the students. This is a great advantage to the students who require extra coaching.

Students who complete the two-year degree program at community college are likely to complete their four-year degree. Research indicates that students who start at universities for four-year degrees usually drop out of the course mid way. A two-year community college degree will also help to increase the earning capability of the individual even if he does not complete the four-year degree course.

There are some disadvantages associated with community colleges that one should be aware of. Some universities do not accept transfer credits of courses completed at the community colleges. Ensure that you check out the courses required at the university that you plan to transfer to for further education. Another problem could be the availability of certain courses that you may want to do, or the limited number of courses on offer at the community college.

In conclusion, the community college education can be a useful, instructive and an affordable option for formal education. It can be considered as a stepping-stone to the higher level of University education.